Graduate

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Q. What if I have not studied Latin or ancient Greek at the undergraduate level—can I still apply to the graduate program?

A. No. We do not accept students without the equivalent of three years of college-level Latin and (for all degrees except the M.A.T.) two years of college-level ancient Greek. We recommend you pursue a post-baccalaureate program in the ancient languages. Details of the Rutgers Classics Post-Baccaulareate program are here: http://classics.rutgers.edu/post-bacc


Q. I studied Latin and ancient Greek in college, but I did not major in Classics—can I still apply to the graduate program?

A. Yes.  Coursework in classical civilization is desirable, but coursework in the ancient languages is given the highest priority.
 

Q. I already have a master’s degree in Classics and would like to pursue a Ph.D. at Rutgers.  Will I have to do another master’s degree?

A. Those students who seek to enter Rutgers Classics from another graduate program are evaluated on an individual basis.  Generally such applicants should expect that no more than 12 credits will be transferred from their previous institution.  In addition, such applicants take a diagnostic examination at the end of the first year to assess competency in the ancient languages, and may be asked to take the full M.A. comprehensive examination.


Q. How do I apply to the Rutgers Classics graduate program?

A. The admissions process is handled by Rutgers Graduate Admissions.  Please go through their website:

http://gradstudy.rutgers.edu/

The Classics department is not allowed to receive materials directly from applicants.  This includes letters of recommendation.  Please send all materials directly to Rutgers Graduate Admissions. 
 

Q. Do I need a writing sample?

A. It is recommended but not required.
 

Q. Regarding letters of recommendation, who should write on my behalf? 

A. Successful applicants typically have letters from three faculty members, at least two of whom can attest to the competency of the applicant in the relevant ancient languages.
 

Q. How do I visit the Rutgers Classics department?

A. We welcome and encourage prospective students to visit.  If you plan to be in the area, please let the graduate director know.  Generally 48-hours notice is sufficient.  We prefer having prospective students visit us when classes are in session in the fall or spring semesters.
 

Q. What if I am interested in the graduate program, and have the qualifications for matriculation, but do not want to formally enroll.  Can I take classes on a non-matriculated basis?

A. Qualified students should obtain a copy of their undergraduate transcript and consult with the graduate director.
 

Q. Do you accept students to start in the spring semester?

A. Typically no. 
 

Q. Can I seek a degree on a part-time basis?

A. Yes, but fellowship funding is available only for full-time doctoral track students.
 

Q. Can I apply for funding for the M.A. or M.A.T. tracks?

A. Unfortunately, fellowship funding is not available for M.A. or M.A.T. students.
 

Q. Are graduate courses offered in the summer?

A. Typically no.
 

Q. I applied to the Ph.D. program, however, I received a letter from Rutgers Graduate Admissions stating I was admitted the M.A. program.  Why is this?

A. In all likelihood, you were admitted to the doctoral track master’s program.  We put all our Ph.D. applicants into the doctoral master’s track.  After matriculation, students consult with the graduate director about their coursework and exam requirements.
 

Q. If I am accepted into the program, when can I start taking courses through the inter-university doctoral consortium?

A. Typically in the second year of graduate study.
 

Q. How do I find out about graduate housing, health insurance, and other practical matters?

A. Please consult the following websites:

http://housing.rutgers.edu/ie/

http://gsnb.rutgers.edu/health.php3

http://gsnb.rutgers.edu/index.php3

Reading lists:  M.A., M.A.T., and Ph.D. 

Click here to download reading lists.

The faculty has devised six separate reading lists to facilitate successful performance on the various comprehensive exam options (listed below):

 

Reading Lists for the MAT in Latin

Caesar, Gallic Wars 1; Civil War 1.1-33

Catullus 1-11, 13, 29, 31, 34, 36, 37, 42, 45, 46, 49-51, 63-66, 68

Cicero, Pro Caelio; Second Philippic; Pro Archia; In Catilinam 1; Epistulae (as in Shackleton Bailey, Select Letters, Cambridge, 1980) 1-7, 9, 11, 12, 15, 18-20, 23- 24, 27, 32-35, 38, 41, 48, 52, 54, 62, 63, 67-69, 74-75; De Oratore 1.1-73; De Republica (as in James Zetzel, Cambridge, 1995) 6.9-29 (Somnium Scipionis)

Horace, Epodes 2; 16; Odes 1; Satires 1.1, 1.9; 2.6

Juvenal, Satires 1; 10

Livy, Ab Urbe Condita Praef.; 1; 21

Lucretius, De Rerum Natura 1

Martial, Epigrammata: Book 1: Praef., 1-4, 9, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 20, 29, 32; Book 2: Epist.; Book 8: 55, 73; Book 9: Epist.; Book 10: 1, 2; Book 12: Epist., 57, 94; Book 13: 3; Book 14: 2

Ovid, Metamorphoses 1, 4.55-189; Amores 1

Petronius, Satyrica 26.7-78 (Cena Trimalchionis)

Plautus, Pseudolus

Pliny the Younger, Epistulae 6.16, 20; 7.27; 10.96-97

Propertius 1 (all)

Sallust, Bellum Catilinae 1-16; Bellum Jugurthinum 1-8

Seneca, Epistulae Morales 7, 12, 56, 114

Tacitus, Annales 1; 4; 14.1-17; Agricola

Terence, Adelphoe

Tibullus 1.1; 2.5

Vergil, Aeneid 1-8; 12

 

 

Reading Lists for the M.A. in Classics

Greek authors

 

Andocides, selections from On the Mysteries, On the Peace in R.C. Jebb, Selections from The Attic Orators

Aristophanes, Clouds

Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics 1; Politics 1 Callimachus: as in Neil Hopkinson, A Hellenistic Anthology (Cambridge, 1988), including Epigrams; also Epigr. 28 Pfeiffer (= Anth. Pal.12.43)

Demosthenes, Olynthiacs 1, 2, 3

Euripides, Medea

Greek Lyric Poets: as in David A. Campbell, Greek Lyric Poets (St. Martin's, 1982) pages 1-32 (through Solon 1), 40-82 (through Theognis 182), 87-100, plus Appendix, pages 463-466 (Archilochus, P. Colon. 7511, Stesichorus S15 ii Page, Alcaeus S262 Page); frag. 11 West

Herodotus 1; 6.94-120

Hesiod, Theogony 1-210

Homer, Iliad 1; 9; 22, 24 {92}; Odyssey 1; 9, 11; 21-23

Homeric Hymn 5 (To Aphrodite)

Isocrates, selections from Antidosis, Panegyricus, Areopagiticus in R.C. Jebb, Selections from The Attic Orators

Lysias, Against Eratosthenes

Pindar, Olympian 1, 14; Nemean 5; Isthmian

Plato, Apology ; Republic 1; 10

Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus

Theocritus, Idylls 1

Thucydides 1, 2.34-54

 

Latin Authors

 

Caesar, Gallic Wars 1.1-29; Civil War 1.1-33

Catullus 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, 11, 31, 34, 45, 49, 50, 51, 64

Cicero, Pro Caelio; In Catilinam 1; Epistulae (as in Shackleton Bailey, Select Letters, Cambridge, 1980) 1, 3, 4, 7, 9, 11, 15, 18, 19, 20, 24, 27, 32, 33, 38, 48, 52, 54, 67, 68, 74, 75; De Oratore 1.1-29; De Republica (as in James Zetzel, Cambridge, 1995) 6.9-29 (=Somnium Scipionis)

Horace, Odes 1; Sat. 1.1; Ep. 16

Juvenal, Sat. 1

Livy, Ab Urbe Condita, Praef.;  1

Lucretius, De Rerum Natura 1.1-448, 921-950

Martial, Epigrammata: Book 1: 1.1-4, 9, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 20, 29, 32; 8.55, 73; 12.57, 94

Ovid, Met 1.1-252, 348-567; Amores 1

Petronius, Satyrica 26.7-60, 71-78 (excerpts from Cena Trimalchionis)

Plautus, Pseudolus

Pliny the Younger, Epistulae 6.16, 20; 7.27; 10.96-97

Propertius 1 (all)

Sallust, Bellum Catilinae 1-16; Bellum Jugurthinum 1-8

Seneca, Epistulae Morales 12, 114

Tacitus, Annales 1; 14.1-17; Agricola

Terence, Adelphoe

Tibullus 1.1; 2.5

Vergil, Aeneid 1; 2; 4; 6; 8; 12

 

 

Reading lists for M.A. in Classics: Interdisciplinary Classics and Ancient History option

Greek Authors

 

Aeschylus, Persae

Andocides, On the Mysteries

Aristophanes, Lysistrata

Aristotle, Politics 1

Demosthenes, Olynthiacs 1; 2; 3

Euripides, Medea

Greek Lyric Poets: as follows from D. A. Campbell, Greek Lyric Poets (St. Martin's Press, 1982): Archilochus 1-3, 5A, 22, 53, 55-56, 60, 74, 77, 79A; Tyrtaeus 1; Semonides 7; Alcman 1; Theognis 19-26, 39-68, 77-78, 113-14, 173-92, 237-54, 503-10, 667-82, 783-88; Mimnermus 1-2, 5; Solon 1, 3, 5, 19, 24; Sappho 1, 5, 16, 31, 47, 55, 81b, 96; Alcaeus 6, 34a, 42, 129, 326, 357; Ibycus 282a; Anacreon 348, 357-59, 388, 417; Xenophanes 1-2; Simonides 520-21, 531, 542, 581, 76D, 83D.

Herodotus 1

Hesiod, Works and Days 1-316

Homer, Iliad 1; 9; 24; Odyssey 1; 9; 23

Homeric Hymn: To Demeter

Isocrates, Panegyricus

Lysias 12 (Against Eratosthenes)

Pindar, Olympian 1

Plato, Apology; Republic 1

Plutarch, Solon

Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus

Thucydides 1

Meiggs-Lewis, A Selection of Greek Historical Inscriptions, 2nd ed. (Oxford 1988) 1, 5, 23, 2

 

Latin Authors

 

Caesar, Gallic Wars 1; Civil War 1.1-33

Catullus 1-11, 13, 29, 31, 34, 36, 37, 42, 45, 46, 49-51, 63-66, 68

Cicero, Pro Caelio; Second Philippic ; In Catilinam 1; Epistulae (as in Shackleton Bailey, Select Letters, Cambridge, 1980) 1-7, 9, 11, 12, 15, 18-20, 23- 24, 27, 32-35, 38, 41, 48, 52, 54, 62, 63, 67-69, 74, 75; De Oratore 1.1-73; De Republica (as in James Zetzel, Cambridge, 1995) 6.9-29 (Somnium Scipionis}

Horace, Epodes 2; 16; Odes 1; Satires 1.1, 1.9; 2.6

Juvenal, Satires 1; 10

Livy, Ab Urbe Condita Praef.; 1; 21

Lucretius, De Rerum Natura 1.1-502

Martial, Epigrammata: Book 1: Praef., 1-4, 9, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 20, 29, 32; Book 2: Epist.; Book 8: 55, 73; Book 9: Epist.; Book 10: 1, 2; Book 12: Epist., 57, 94; Book 13: 3; Book 14: 2

Ovid, Metamorphoses 1; Amores 1

Petronius, Satyrica 26.7-78 (Cena Trimalchionis)

Plautus, Pseudolus

Pliny the Younger, Epistulae 6.16, 20; 7.27; 10.96-97

Propertius 1 (all)

Sallust, Bellum Catilinae 1-16; Bellum Jugurthinum 1-8

Seneca, Epistulae Morales 7, 12, 56, 114

Suetonius, Claudius

Tacitus, Annales 1; 4; 14.1-17; Agricola

Terence, Adelphoe

Tibullus 1.1; 2.5

Vergil, Aeneid 1-8; 12

Inscriptions: SC de bacchanalibus (ILLRP 511); Laudatio 'Turiae' (ILS 8393); Res Gestae divi Augusti; Senatus consultum de Pisone patre; Lex de imperio Vespasiani (ILS 244 = Crawford, Roman Statutes I 39)

 

 

Reading Lists for the Ph.D. in Classics

Greek Authors

 

Aeschylus, Oresteia

Andocides, On the Mysteries

Apollonius, Argonautica 1.1-22; 3

Aristophanes, Clouds; Frogs

Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics 1; 2; 3; 6; 10; Politics 1; Poetics

Callimachus: selections in Neil Hopkinson, A Hellenistic Anthology (Cambridge, 1988), including Epigrams, and Epigr. 28 Pfeiffer (= Anth. Pal.12.43)

Bacchylides: as in Campbell (see under "Greek Lyric Poets")

Demosthenes, Olynthiacs 1; 2; 3; On the Crown

Euripides, Medea; Hippolytus; Bacchae

Greek Lyric Poets: as in D. A. Campbell, Greek Lyric Poets (St. Martin's Press, 1982); P. Colon. 7511 (the "Cologne Archilochus": text in Page, Supplementum Lyricis Graecis; text and commentary in Degani-Burzacchini, Lirici Greci, Florence, 1908 and in J.M. Bremer et al., Some Recently Found Greek Poems, Leiden, 1987); Simonides frag. 11 West.

Herodotus 1; 2.1-50, 69-73, 86-91, 99-134; 6.94-120; 7.1-19, 100-105, 201-39; 8.57-110

Hesiod, Theogony 1-210; Works and Days 1-316

Homer, Iliad 1; 2.1-493; 3; 6; 9; 16-24; Odyssey 1; 5-6; 9-12; 16-17; 21-23

Homeric Hymn: To Demeter

Isocrates, Panegyricus

Longus, Daphnis and Chloe 1 (all); 4 (all)

Lucian, Menippus

Lysias 12 (Against Eratosthenes)

Menander, Dyskolos

Pindar, Olympians 1, 14; Nemeans 5, 7; Pythians 1, 8; Isthmians 1

Plato, Apology; Symposium; Crito; Gorgias; Republic 1; 10

Plutarch, Solon 1-4, 8-10, 14-19, 31-32

Polybius, Histories 6.11-18; 10.2-3; 38.1-3.8; 39.8

Protagoras: B fragments, as in H. Diels and W. Kranz, Fragmente der Vorsokratiker (1952/6), vol.2

Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus; Antigone; Ajax

Theocritus, Idylls 1, 7, 11, 15

Thucydides 1-2.65; 3.1-50, 70-85; 4.1-41; 5.1-20, 84-116; 6.8-32; 7.65-87

Xenophon, Memorabilia 1

Meiggs-Lewis, A Selection of Greek Historical Inscriptions 2 (Oxford 1988) 1, 5, 23, 24, 26, 33, 41, 54, 94

Latin Authors

Apuleius, Metamorphoses 1 (all); 2.7-10, 21-30; 4.27-35; 5.21-24; 6.20-24; 9.5-13; 11.23-30

Caesar, Gallic Wars 1; Civil War 1

Catullus: all

Cicero, Pro Caelio; Second Philippic; Pro Archia; In Catilinam 1, 4; De Imperio Cn. Pompei ; Epistulae (as in Shackleton Bailey, Select Letters, Cambridge, 1980) 1-7, 9, 11, 12, 15, 18-20, 23-24, 27, 32-35, 38, 41, 48, 52, 54, 62, 63, 67-69, 74-75; Tusculan Disputations 1; De Re Publica 1, 6 (selections, as in James Zetzel, Cambridge, 1995); De Oratore 1

Ennius: longer fragments of the Annales, ed. Skutsch

Horace, Epodes 1, 2, 7, 9, 16; Odes 1-4; Satires 1 (all); 2.1, 6, 7; Epistles 2.1 (Letter to Augustus), 2.3 (Ars Poetica)

Juvenal, Satires 1, 3, 6.1-285, 10

Livy, Ab Urbe Condita Praef., 1 (all), 6 (all), 21 (all)

Lucan, Civil War 1, 7

Lucretius, De Rerum Natura 1 (all); 3 (all); 4.962-1287; 5.772-1457

Martial, Liber de Spect. 1-2, 9(7), 15 (13), 20 (17); Epigrammata: Book 1: Praef., 1-4, 9, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 20, 29, 32; Book 2: Epist.; Book 8: 55, 73; Book 9: Epist.; Book 10: 1, 2; Book 12: Epist., 57, 94; Book 13: 3; Book 14: 2

Ovid, Metamorphoses 1 (all); 4.55-189; 8.1-444, 611-878; 14.527-608, 805-851; 15.745-879; Amores 1 (all); Tristia 4.10

Persius, Prol.; 1

Petronius, Satyrica 1-90

Plautus, Pseudolus; Amphitruo

Pliny, Epistulae 1.1, 5, 6; 2.1; 3.5, 7, 16, 21; 4.14; 5.8; 6.16, 20; 7.17, 27, 33; 8.20; 9.6, 7, 10, 33;

10.96-97

Propertius, ed. Goold (Loeb): 1 (all); 2.1, 7, 34; 3.1, 3, 4, 5, 9; 4 (all)

Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria 10.1

Sallust, Bellum Catilinae; Bellum Jugurthinum 1-8

Seneca, Epistulae Morales 7, 12, 47, 51, 56, 86, 114, 122; Medea

Tacitus, Agricola; Dialogus de oratoribus; Histories 1; Annales 1.1-2.26; 4.1-12, 32-67; 6.18-30, 50-51; 11.23-38; 12.58-13.25; 14.1-65 (all); 15.38-65; 16.18-35

Terence, Adelphoe

Tibullus, 1 (all); 2.1, 2.5

Vergil, Eclogues; Georgics 1 (all); 4 (all); Aeneid

Late Latin (after 300 C.E.): 25 pages of selections (total) from at least two of the following: Augustine, Confessions 1, 8, 10; Ammianus Marcellinus 14, 15; Ausonius; Carmina Burana; Claudian; Macrobius; Sidonius Apollinaris; Symmachus. (You should consult with the Graduate Director about this section.)

 

 

Reading Lists for the Ph.D. in Classics: Interdisciplinary Classics and Ancient History option

 

Greek Authors

 

Aeschylus, Agamemnon; Persae

Andocides, On the Mysteries

Antiphon, from R.C. Jebb, Selections from the Attic Orators III

Apollonius, Argonautica 1.1-22; 3

Aristophanes, Lysistrata; Frogs

Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics 1; Politics 1; Poetics; Ath. Pol. 1-45

Arrian, Anabasis 1.1-16

Bacchylides: as in Campbell (see under "Greek Lyric Poets")

Callimachus: selections in Neil Hopkinson, A Hellenistic Anthology (Cambridge, 1988), including Epigrams, and Epigr. 28 Pfeiffer (= Anth.Pal.12.43)

Demosthenes, Olynthiacs 1; 2; 3; On the Crown

Euripides, Medea; Hippolytus; Bacchae

Greek Lyric Poets: as in D. A. Campbell, Greek Lyric Poets (St. Martin's Press, 1982); P. Colon. 7511 (the "Cologne Archilochus": text in Page, Supplementum Lyricis Graecis; text and commentary in Degani-Burzacchini, Lirici Greci,Florence, 1908 and in J.M. Bremer et al., Some Recently Found Greek Poems, Leiden, 1987); Simonides frag. 11 West., Hellenica Oxyrhynchia VI(I)-VIII(III), XV(X)-XXII(XVII)

Herodotus 1; 2.1-50, 69-73, 86-91, 99-134; 6.94-120; 7.1-19, 100-105, 201-39; 8.57-110

Hesiod, Theogony 1-210; Works and Days 1-316

Homer, Iliad 1; 2.1-493; 3; 6; 9; 16, 18, 22-24; Odyssey 1; 6; 9-11; 17; 21; 23

Homeric Hymn: To Demeter

Isaeus, R.C. Jebb, from Selections from the Attic Orators I-II

Isocrates, Panegyricus

Longus, Daphnis and Chloe 1 (all); 4 (all)

Lucian, Menippus

Lysias 12 (Against Eratosthenes); 13 (Against Agoratus); from R.C. Jebb, Selections from the Attic Orators, Lysias I-IV

Menander, Dyskolos

Pindar, Olympians 1; Nemeans 5, 7; Pythians 1, 8; Isthmians 1

Plato, Apology; Symposium; Crito; Republic 1; 10

Plutarch, Solon; Themistocles; Sulla

Polybius, Histories 6

Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus; Antigone

Theocritus, Idylls 1, 7, 11, 15

Thucydides 1-2.65; 3.1-50, 70-85; 4.1-41; 5.1-20, 84-116; 6.8-32; 7.65-87

Xenophon, Memorabilia 1; Hellenica 1-2.2; "Old Oligarch"

Papyri: G. Milligan, Selections from the Greek Papyri (Cambridge 1912) 1, 4, 5, 10, 12, 19, 24, 30, 38, 45, 47, 51, 53

Inscriptions:

Meiggs-Lewis, A Selection of Greek Historical Inscriptions 2 (Oxford 1988) 1, 5, 8, 10-11, 14-15, 23-24, 26, 31, 33, 41, 45-46, 52, 54, 58, 65, 69, 70, 73, 86, 94

M.N. Tod, A Selection of Greek Historical Inscriptions, Vol. II (Oxford 1948): 118, 123, 142, 162, 177, 189, 202, 204, 205

Hesperia Supp. 29, pp. 4-5

Supplementum Epigraphicum Graecum 26.72; 28.60

Staatsverträge des Altertums 3.428; 446; 476

F. Sokolowski, Lois Sacrées des cités grecques (Paris 1969): 18A-B; 65.1; 116

H.W Pleket, Epigraphica I: 2, 9, 10, 14, 22, 41; Epigraphica II: 1, 3, 6

R. Sherk, Roman Documents from the Greek East (Baltimore 1969) 2, 15, 23, 31, 33

 

Latin Authors

 

Apuleius, Metamorphoses 1 (all); 2.7-10, 21-30; 4.27-35; 5.21-24; 6.20-24; 9.5-13; 11.23-30

Caesar, Gallic Wars 1; Civil War 1

Catullus: all poems

Cicero, Pro Caelio; Second Philippic; In Catilinam 1, 4; De Imperio Cn. Pompei ; Epistulae as in Shackleton Bailey, Select Letters, Cambridge, 1980) 1-7, 9, 11, 12, 15, 18-20, 23-24, 27, 32-35, 38, 41, 48, 52, 54, 62, 63, 67-69, 74-75; Brutus; De Re Publica 1, 6 (selections, as in James Zetzel, Cambridge, 1995); Verrines I

Ennius: longer fragments of the Annales, ed. Skutsch

Historia Augusta, Life of Hadrian

Horace, Epodes 1, 2, 7, 9, 16; Odes 1-4; Satires 1 (all); 2.1, 6, 7; Epistles 2.1 (Letter to Augustus), 2.3 (Ars Poetica)

Juvenal, Satires 1, 3, 6.1-285, 10

Livy, Ab Urbe Condita Praef., 1 (all), 6 (all), 21 (all)

Lucan, Civil War 1, 7

Lucretius, De Rerum Natura 1.1-502; 3; 4.962-1287; 5.772-1457

Martial, Liber de Spect. 1-2, 9(7), 15 (13), 20 (17); Epigrammata: Book 1: Praef., 1-4, 9, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 20, 29, 32; Book 2: Epist.; Book 8: 55, 73; Book 9: Epist.; Book 10: 1, 2; Book 12: Epist., 57, 94; Book 13: 3; Book 14: 2

Ovid, Metamorphoses 1; Amores 1; Fasti 4; Tristia 4.10

Persius, Prol.; 1

Petronius, Satyrica 1-90

Plautus, Pseudolus; Amphitruo

Pliny, Epistulae 1.1, 5, 6; 2.1; 3.5, 7, 16, 21; 4.14; 5.8; 6.16, 20; 7.17, 27, 33; 8.20; 9.6, 7, 10, 33; 10.96-97; Panegyricus 1-37

Propertius, ed. Goold (Loeb): 1 (all); 2.1, 7, 34; 3.1, 3, 4, 5, 9; 4 (all)

Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria 10.1

Sallust, Bellum Catilinae; Bellum Jugurthinum 1-8; Histories FF 1.55, 1.77, 2.47, 2.98,

3.48, 4.69 M

Seneca, Epistulae Morales 7, 12, 47, 51, 56, 86, 114, 122; Medea

Suetonius, Claudius

Tacitus, Agricola; Dialogus de oratoribus; Histories 1; Annales 1.1-2.26; 4.1-12, 32-67; 6.18-30, 50-51; 11.23-38; 12.58-13.25; 14.1-65 (all); 15.38-65; 16.18-35

Terence, Adelphoe

Tertullian, De Spectaculis

Tibullus, 1 (all); 2.1, 2.5

Vergil, Eclogues; Georgics 1 (all); 4 (all); Aeneid 1-8, 12

Late Latin (after 300 C.E.): 25 pages of selections (total) from at least two of the following: Augustine, Confessions 1, 8, 10 or Civitas Dei 3; Ammianus Marcellinus 14, 15; Ausonius; Carmina Burana; Claudian; Lactantius, Macrobius; Sidonius Apollinaris; Symmachus

Inscriptions:

SC de bacchanalibus (ILLRP 511)

Lex Repetundarum and Lex Agraria (Crawford, Roman Statutes I 1 and 2)

Laudatio 'Turiae' (ILS 8393)

Res Gestae divi Augusti

Tabula Siarensis and Hebana (Lex Valeria Aurelia) (Crawford, RS I 24)

Tabula Heraclensis (Crawford, RS I 24)

Lex Colonia Genetivae Iuliae (Crawford, RS I 25)

Senatus consultum de Pisone patre

Lex de imperio Vespasiani (ILS 244 = Crawford, RS I 39)

"Mactar Harvester" (ILS 7457)

Allia Potestas (epitaph) (CIL 6.37965 = CLE 1988)

 

 

 

Degree Requirements for the M.A.T., M.A., Ph.D. 

The Ph.D. candidate is expected to have a knowledge of all major authors; to include work beyond both the Greek fifth and fourth centuries B.C.E. and the Republican and Augustan periods of Rome; to have an acquaintance with the inter-dependence of Greek and Roman literature and culture; to demonstrate an understanding of past and current scholarly trends; and to undertake research in a specific aspect of classics or its related fields.  The Ph.D. candidate is expected to complete at least 48 credits of coursework beyond the bachelor's degree and to demonstrate a reading knowledge of German and either French or Italian.  In the final semester of coursework, candidates for the Ph.D. must take preliminary comprehensive examinations comprising Greek and Latin translation and general knowledge questions on Classical texts, based on the Ph.D. reading list, as well as questions on a special field and a special author.  Upon successful completion of the exams, in the subsequent semester, students must submit a thesis proposal for approval by the department faculty.

The M.A. candidate must demonstrate a general knowledge of the principal ancient authors and may write a thesis (equivalent to 6 credits).  The candidate may elect to emphasize either Greek or Latin, but must have a knowledge of both.  The M.A. student is also expected to demonstrate reading knowledge of French, German, or Italian.  Candidates for the degree must pass the M.A. comprehensive examination, which they are expected to take after completing 30 credits of graduate coursework.  The M.A. examination comprises Greek and Latin translation and general knowledge questions on Classical texts, based on the M.A. reading list. 

The master’s program in Latin for teachers (M.A.T.) is designed to train teachers of Latin in secondary schools.  The candidate is expected to pass a competency examination in ancient Greek or, alternatively, to demonstrate a reading knowledge of German, French, or Italian; to complete a total of 30 graduate credits; to complete an expository or critical essay (normally in conjunction with the course work); and to pass the M.A.T. comprehensive examination comprising Latin translation and general knowledge questions on Classical texts, based on the M.A.T. reading list.  N.B. The M.A.T. degree does not offer NJ Certification.

An interdisciplinary Ph.D. in art history and classical archaeology may be worked out with advisers from the art history and classics programs. Students in such a program would have to show proficiency in French, German, Greek, and Latin. A concentration in interdisciplinary classical studies and ancient history is available for M.A. and Ph.D. candidates. Applicants for this option are expected to possess a background in Greek and Roman history in addition to the other qualifications for admission to the classics program. Specialized M.A. and doctoral reading lists are provided for this concentration, and special field/special author examinations for the Ph.D. are focused on classical history. Doctoral candidates are examined on their knowledge of Greek and Roman history, in addition to literature.

 

Guidelines for Admission

To be accepted into the Rutgers Classics graduate program, an applicant should have the equivalent of at least three years of college-level Latin and two years of college-level ancient Greek (M.A.T. applicants are exempt from the ancient Greek requirement). Successful applicants typically have an overall GPA of at least 3.3, and higher in the major. All available transcripts and other materials should be sent directly to Rutgers Graduate Admissions.

Applicants must take the GRE exam. Successful applicants typically report scores above 163 VB and 5.0 WR.

Competency in French, German, or Italian at the time of matriculation is desirable, though not a requirement.

Three letters of recommendation are required and should be sent directly to Rutgers Graduate Admissions.

A writing sample is encouraged.

Those students who seek to enter Rutgers Classics from another graduate program are evaluated on an individual basis. Generally such applicants should expect that no more than 12 credits will be transferred from their previous institution.

Applicants are strongly encouraged to apply by January 1 to receive full consideration for funding.

We encourage applicants to visit our department at any stage of the application process. Please contact the graduate director at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and let us know when you will be in the area.

All application materials should go to Rutgers Graduate Admissions:
http://gradstudy.rutgers.edu/

Types of Funding Available

Rutgers Classics offers a number of funding options to PhD students. The standard package is five years, with a fellowship stipend for the first and last years, and a teaching assistantship for the middle three years. In addition, advanced students may be given the opportunity to teach as a part-time lecturer in the undergraduate curriculum or at neighboring institutions.

Typical fellowships include the following:

  • Graduate School Excellence Fellowship, which carries an annual stipend and tuition remission for five years.
  • Presidential Fellowship, which carries a significantly enhanced stipend and tuition remission for two years.
  • Graduate School diversity fellowship, the Trustees Fellowship in the Humanities and Social Sciences, which carries an annual stipend and tuition remission for two years.
  • University and Louis Bevier Graduate Fellowship, a highly competitive, one-year fellowship for Rutgers University undergraduates who want to pursue graduate studies at Rutgers. 
  • University and Louis Bevier Dissertation Fellowship, a highly competitive, one-year fellowship for students who will have completed their comprehensive examinations, have an approved dissertation proposal, and have begun their thesis research by the beginning of the Fall term.

Graduate Program Description

RU Classics focuses on the interpretation of original texts in Greek and Latin in the context of the general humanistic tradition. Our graduate students master the philological methods of the discipline and become familiar with the methods of such related fields as literary theory, ancient history, philosophy, and ancient art history. Full-time students generally finish the M.A. track in two years; candidates for the Ph.D. on average take an additional three years.

We offer six degree tracks leading to three different advanced degrees:

M.A. Classics
M.A. Interdisciplinary Classics and Ancient History
M.A.T. Latin
Ph.D. Classics
Ph.D. Interdisciplinary Classics and Ancient History
Ph.D. Joint program in Classics and Art History (by individual arrangement)
 

Classics Graduate Student Association

The Classics Graduate Student Association (GSA) enhances the social interaction and intellectual engagement of our students.  Its main activity is to organize a lecture series each year that brings in leading scholars to share their work.  It also organizes graduate student conferences on a 
periodic basis.

 

Greek and Latin Fest

Greek Fest and its counterpart Latin Fest are two annual conferences celebrating Greek and Latin literature.  Greek Fest is held in October and Latin Fest in April. Participants include graduate students and faculty of the following universities: Rutgers, UPenn, Princeton, Columbia, and NYU. The conferences are conducted in a seminar-style format, where graduate students make short presentations leading to discussion among the participants.  Recent conferences have focused on:  Apollonius of Rhodes (Argonautica Book 4), Hippocrates (Airs, Waters, Places), Pliny the Elder (Natural History), Plautus (Rudens), Seneca (Octavia), Tacitus (Agricola), the Priapea, Phaedrus (Fables), and various openings of Cicero's works. 

 

Ethel S. Cook Travel Grants

The Department of Classics holds an annual competition for scholarships to support travel abroad for programs that specialize in fields covered by Classical studies.  These include Mediterranean archaeology and art history, ancient history, and studies in Greek and Latin literature and documents.  Relevant programs include, but are not limited to, those associated with the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, the American Academy in Rome, College Year in Athens, the Intercollegiate Center in Rome, American Research Center in Sofia (Bulgaria), and archaeological field schools, such as Rutgers University Archaeological Field School in Italy.  Rutgers students with GPA averages of 3.3 or better are eligible.  Applications will be accepted for programs in:  the summer, fall or spring semesters, or for an academic year.  For more information, please go to:

Ethel S. Cook Travel Scholarship Application

 

 

 

 

Contact Us

Rutgers Classics Department
Academic Building, 6th floor
15 Seminary Place
College Avenue Campus
New Brunswick, NJ 08901

classics@classics.rutgers.edu
(848) 932 9797