Graduate

Course Descriptions - Graduate

Two or three of the following courses are offered each term:

16:190:503. INTRODUCTION TO GRADUATE LITERARY STUDY: LATIN (3)

Close readings and basic critical techniques of interpreting Latin literature.

16:190:504. INTRODUCTION TO GRADUATE LITERARY STUDY:

GREEK (3)

Close readings and basic critical techniques of interpreting Greek literature.

16:190:505. STUDIES IN CLASSICS (3)

Topics in the field of classics selected for special study.

16:190:507,508. READINGS IN CLASSICS (3,3)

Readings in areas of special interest in Latin and/or Greek authors.

16:190:509. PROSEMINAR: MATERIALS AND METHODS (3)

Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of Latin and Greek.

Introduction to the discipline of classical philology. Topics covered include bibliography, lexicography, linguistics, textual history and criticism, geography, paleography, papyrology, epigraphy, and literary theory.

16:190:510. HELLENISTIC LITERATURE (3)

Extensive readings in the major authors of the Hellenistic Age (350–30 B.C.), especially those who influenced Roman literature and thought.

16:190:511. GREEK LITERATURE OF THE ROMAN PERIOD (3)

Greek authors of the Roman period (30 B.C.–A.D. 500) selected with a view to their influence on the literature and thought of the Roman Empire.

16:190:519,520,521,522. LATIN LITERATURE SEMINAR (3,3,3,3)

Work of a different Latin author (for example, Catullus, Propertius/Tibullus, VirgilOvid/Petronius).

16:190:523. SEMINAR ON ROME AND POMPEII (3)

Research and instruction at Rutgers and in Italy on Rome and Pompeii. Includes oral presentations and a paper.

16:190:525. HISTORIANS OF REPUBLICAN ROME (3)

Critical reading of selected fragments from Roman annalistic writers, and an intensive study of the historical writings of Caesar and Sallust.

16:190:526. HISTORIANS OF IMPERIAL ROME (3)

Selected major Greek and Latin texts for the history of the Roman Empire. The periods covered by Tacitus to Ammianus Marcellinus.

16:190:530. ARISTOTLE: CONSTITUTION OF THE ATHENIANS (3)

Analysis of Aristotle’s Athenaion Politeia and other documents pertaining to the development of Greek political institutions.

16:190:557. HOMER (3)

The Iliad and Odyssey in their historical, literary, and cultural backgrounds.

16:190:559,560. PLATO (3,3)

Several major dialogues of Plato studied with special emphasis on the philosophical problems they raise.

16:190:562. ATTIC HISTORIOGRAPHY (3)

Greek history of the sixth and fifth centuries B.C. in the Greek historiographic tradition. Emphasis on detailed study of the texts, especially Thucydides.

16:190:563,564. GREEK DRAMA (3,3)

Tragedians: Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides; the comedies of Aristophanes.

16:190:565. HERODOTUS (3)

Study of the beginnings of the Greek historiographic tradition in the sixth and fifth centuries B.C., with primary emphasis on Herodotus.

16:190:566,567. ANCIENT NOVELS (3,3)

Greek and Roman prose fiction of the postclassical period in its literary and sociohistorical contexts.

16:190:569. ADVANCEDGREEK PROSE COMPOSITION (3)

Study of the styles of Attic prose of the fifth and fourth centuries and composition in the manner of select authors of classical Attic Greek.

16:190:570. ADVANCED LATIN PROSE COMPOSITION (3)

Study of the stylistic development of Latin prose and composition in the manner of select classical authors.

16:190:571. ROMAN DRAMA (3)

Selected works from the dramatic literature of Rome.

16:190:573. ANCIENT COMEDY (3)

Study of the conventions of Greek and Roman comedy.

16:190:575. VERGIL (3)

The Eclogues, Georgics, or Aeneid of Vergil, with attention to literary predecessors, cultural context, influence, and ancient and modern criticism.

16:190:579. PROBLEMS IN AUGUSTAN LITERATURE (3)

Individual topics for research and criticism involving relationships among the elegiac poets, Horace, and Vergil.

16:190:612. GREEK AND ROMAN BIOGRAPHY (3)

Study of the development of classical biography through selected works from major authors in Greek and Latin, including Xenophon, Plutarch, Nepos, and Suetonius.

16:190:614. CLASSICAL EPIC (3)

Comparative study of Homer, Apollonius, Vergil, and Lucan as epic poets.

16:190:620,621. TOPICS IN GREEK AND ROMAN

ARCHAEOLOGY (3,3)

Intensive study of special Greek and Roman archaeological monuments and their significance for the literature, religion, and history of the classical civilizations.

16:190:622. LATIN EPIGRAPHY (3)

Practical introduction to the study of Latin inscriptions, with emphasis on the reading, interpretation, and editing of texts on stone.

16:190:623. LATIN PALEOGRAPHY (3)

Practical introduction to the study of Latin manuscripts from the Middle Ages and Renaissance, with emphasis on the reading, interpretation, editing, and transmission of Latin texts.

16:190:624. THE BOOK (3)

Study of the relationship between the media of publication and conventions of reading in antiquity and the literary forms of classical Greek and Latin literature.

16:190:625. ROME IN THE AGE OF AUGUSTUS (3)

Archaeological survey of urban planning; architectural and artistic achievements in Rome and the provinces seen in the broader perspective of Augustus’s political and cultural program.

16:190:630. CLASSICAL GREEK SCULPTURE (3)

Stylistic and thematic discussion of the works of individual sculptors and of major monuments, such as temple pediments and friezes from 480 B.C. to the end of the fourth century.

16:190:631. ROMAN SCULPTURE (3)

The major stylistic periods of Roman sculpture in historical reliefs, sarcophagi, and portraiture from the late Republic to the age of Constantine the Great.

16:190:652. NEW COMEDY AND CHARACTER STUDY (3)

Theophrastus’s Characters and at least two plays of Menander, with emphasis on the various kinds of characters recognized in Greek literature and their relationship to plot and dramatic action.

16:190:654. GREEK ORATORY (3)

Selected Greek public orations with emphasis on their significance in political history and their place in the development of Greek rhetoric.

16:190:655,656. ARISTOTLE (3,3)

Special philosophical problems studied in reference to Aristotle’s work; emphasis on the variety of Aristotle’s interests and the significance of his conceptual language.

16:190:671. LATIN SATIRE (3)

The continuity and development of satire in Greek and Latin literature. Major emphasis on the Roman satirists.

16:190:674. HELLENISTIC AND ROMAN PHILOSOPHY (3)

Major developments in ancient philosophy after Aristotle. Selected problems of philosophical significance in Stoic and Epicurean writings, with special reference to Lucretius, Cicero, and Seneca.

16:190:675. CICERO’S WORKS (3)

Selected orations, treatises, or letters of Cicero against the background of his private and public life, his sources in Greek and Roman thought, and his influence on later Western tradition.

16:190:677,678. HISTORY OF LATIN LITERATURE I:

THE REPUBLIC (3,3)

The origin and development of Latin literature from its birth in the third century B.C. to the end of the Republic.

16:190:679,680. HISTORY OF LATIN LITERATURE II: (3,3)

A survey of the major authors of Latin prose literature from the Roman Republic and Empire.

This seminar will survey Latin Prose Literature, from the Republic through the second century AD. Class sessions will comprise translation and discussion of a range of authors including Cato, Caesar, Cicero, Sallust, Livy and Tacitus. In-class discussion will focus on cultural and political milieus, the influences of Greek predecessors, the development of genres, and the variety of Latin prose styles.


16:190:681,682. HISTORY OF GREEK LITERATURE I: ARCHAIC

AND CLASSICAL (3,3)

Extensive reading in the major authors of the Archaic period; Pindar; beginnings of tragedy and comedy.

16:190:683,684. HISTORY OF GREEK LITERATURE II: CLASSICAL

(CONTINUED) AND HELLENISTIC (3,3)

Extensive reading in the major authors of the classical period not covered in 16:190:681,682 and in Hellenistic literature.

16:190:690  SEMINAR IN ANCIENT HISTORY:

ROMANS, GREEKS & ARABS (3)  

This course deals with the classical world's relationships with what is now the Middle East. It looks at the interactions between the two worlds in terms of cultural importation, influences, mingling, hybridization and transformation.

16:190:701,702. RESEARCH IN CLASSICS (BA,BA

 

Graduate Program in Classics

MA Degree Learning Goals and Assessments

The MA program at RU Classics focuses on the interpretation of original texts in Greek and Latin in the context of the general humanistic tradition. Our graduate students are trained to master the philological methods of the discipline and become familiar with the methods of such related fields as literary theory, ancient history, philosophy, and ancient art history. The goal of the MA degrees in the Classics is to train students at an

advanced level in specific fields of study in order for them to continue graduate studies or to meet professional goals.

 

Learning Goal 1 for Students: Attain mastery of a broad field of learning

Assessment of student achievement of Goal 1:

• Grades in graduate seminars and courses

• Two sets of MA qualifying examinations, in (a) translation into English of original Greek and Latin texts and (b) general knowledge of ancient literature and history, both assessing linguistic competency as well as depth and breadth of cultural and historical knowledge; in addition, there is the option of a capstone paper or research thesis

• Review by faculty of student progress with close advising and mentoring

• Participation of students in regional scholarly conferences and colloquia

• Continuation of graduate studies or placement in a position that requires ability in this field

Role of the program in helping students to achieve Goal 1:

• Close advising to assure that students are being prepared in a coherent and academically rigorous fashion

--includes formal meetings with GPD, twice per semester, to preview and review each semester’s course or research schedule

• Effective monitoring of student progress, with consistent and constructive feedback provided to student

--includes annual reports on research progress to the GPD from both the student and the student’s committee chair

--includes annual review of individual students’ progress by entire program faculty

• Evaluations of teaching effectiveness of instructors in graduate seminars by chair, GPD, and instructors

--If effectiveness is below expectations, work with instructors to improve effectiveness

• Periodic review of curricular offerings and assessment tools by program faculty

• GPD and relevant faculty and staff attend best practices sessions for graduate program directors

• Provide benchmarks from comparable disciplines at other institutions

 

Learning Goal 2 for Students: Engage in and conduct original research

Assessment of graduate student achievement of Goal 2:

• Assessment of quality of graduate seminar papers

            --annual faculty review of MA student progress

            --reading committee for optional MA thesis project

• Achievement of students as evidenced by continuation of graduate studies or professional placement.

Role of the Classics program in helping graduate students to achieve Goal 2:

• Provide early introduction to research methods and opportunities for research

            --MA candidates participate in biannual proseminar introducing students to the field’s main research methods and methodological approaches

• Provide opportunities to present research and receive feedback

• Provide comprehensive advising and assist in the identification of mentors

 

Learning Goal 3 for Students: Prepare to be professionals in the discipline

Assessment of graduate student achievement of Goal 3:

• Collection of data on professional placement or continuation of graduate studies

• Periodic review by external advisory committees

• Exit and follow-up surveys of alumni/ae

• Review evidence of papers presented, publications, membership in professional organizations, and professional networking

Role of the Classics program in helping students achieve Goal 3:

• Encourage participation in professional development programs in such areas as human

subjects research, library use, course management software, interview skills, presentation

skills, development of CVs, use of research tools, training in the responsible conduct of

research, and proposal writing

            --these areas are treated internally in informal seminars as well as the biannual proseminar
 

The faculty of the Classics MA program will regularly review the structure and content of the program and the feedback received from assessments and surveys. These reviews will be used to provide the best possible education to students, one that meets current needs for professionals in the discipline.

Graduate Program in Classics

PhD Degree Learning Goals and Assessment

The doctoral program at RU Classics focuses on the interpretation of original texts in Greek and Latin in the context of the general humanistic tradition. Our graduate students are trained to master the philological methods of the discipline and become familiar with the methods of such related fields as literary theory, ancient history, philosophy, and ancient art history. We are committed to graduating PhDs ready and able to produce high-quality original scholarship and to teach and mentor effectively at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Learning Goal 1 for Students: Attain marked ability, scholarship, and research and instructional skills concerning ancient Greek and Latin authors and texts in their historical, social, and cultural contexts

Assessment of student achievement of Goal 1:

• Grades in graduate seminars and courses

• Two sets of PhD qualifying examinations, in (a) translation into English of original Greek and Latin texts and (b) general knowledge of ancient literature and history, both assessing linguistic competency as well as depth and breadth of cultural and historical knowledge

• Review by faculty of student progress with close advising and mentoring

• Participation of students in regional and national scholarly conferences and colloquia

• Placement in positions and careers that require ability and scholarship in Greek or Latin language, literature, history, or philosophy, and/or areas of study related thereto

Role of the program in helping students to achieve Goal 1:

• Close advising to assure that students are being prepared in a coherent and academically rigorous fashion

--includes formal meetings with GPD, twice per semester, to preview and review each semester’s course or research schedule

• Effective monitoring of student progress, with consistent and constructive feedback provided to student

--includes annual reports on research progress to the GPD from both the student and the student’s committee chair

--includes annual review of individual students’ progress by entire program faculty

• Evaluations of teaching effectiveness of instructors in graduate seminars by chair, GPD, and instructors

--If effectiveness is below expectations, work with instructors to improve effectiveness

• Periodic review of curricular offerings and assessment tools by program faculty

• GPD and relevant faculty and staff attend best practices sessions for graduate program directors

• Provide benchmarks from comparable disciplines at other institutions

 

Learning Goal 2 for Students: Engage in and conduct original research

Assessment of graduate student achievement of Goal 2:

• Preparation of and defense of Ph.D. dissertation proposal by full program faculty

• Assessment of quality of Ph.D. dissertation:

            --oral defense of dissertation

            --critical reading of dissertation by committee of graduate faculty members and a committee member from outside the Rutgers Classics program

• Presentation of original research at regional, national, and international conferences, colloquia, and symposia

• Submission and acceptance of peer-reviewed articles and conference papers based on original research

• Achievement of students as evidenced by professional placements, selection for

conference presentations, peer-reviewed publications and individual grant and fellowship attainment

Role of the graduate program in helping students achieve Goal 2:

• Provide early introduction to research methods and opportunities for research

            --includes a biannual proseminar introducing students to the field’s main research methods and methodological approaches 

• Provide opportunities to present research and receive feedback

• Maintain adequate funding levels through the research phase

• Provide comprehensive advising and assist in the identification of mentors

 

Learning Goal 3 for Students: Prepare to be professionals in careers that require training at the highest levels in the Classics

Assessment of graduate student achievement of Goal 3:

• Review evidence of papers presented, publications, membership in professional organizations, and professional networking

• Evaluations of teaching effectiveness of graduate student instructors

• Collection and review of placement data

• Periodic review by external advisory committees

• Exit and follow-up surveys of alumni/ae

Role of the program in helping students achieve Goal 3:

• Develop discipline-specific programs in concert with the Teaching Assistant Project

• Encourage enrollment in Introduction to College Teaching I and II

• Encourage participation in professional development programs in such areas as human subjects research, library use, course management software, interview skills, presentation skills, development of CVs, use of research tools, training in the responsible conduct of research, and proposal writing

            --these areas are treated internally in informal seminars as well as the biannual proseminar

• Teach students how to do assessments in their future professional capacities

• Develop or enhance programs related to job and networking skills, including activity in

professional societies and preparation for necessary certifications

• Acquaint students with non-academic career opportunities

 

The leadership of the Classics graduate program will regularly review the structure and content of the program and the feedback received from assessments and surveys. These reviews will be used to provide the best possible education to students in order to meet the needs for highly trained individuals Greek and Roman Classical Studies.

Contact Us

Rutgers Classics Department
Academic Building, 6th floor
15 Seminary Place
College Avenue Campus
New Brunswick, NJ 08901

classics@classics.rutgers.edu
(848) 932 9797